Archive | June, 2012

6 Ways to Position Yourself for Success in Your First 90 Days on the Job

11 Jun

Congratulations – you got the job! You searched, networked, applied, interviewed, and aced your way into a great new role. As anyone in the job market will tell you, you’ve done the hardest part. Now all that you need to do to succeed is to be awesome in that shiny new job – or at least not suck so much that you get yourself fired.

The first 90 days is an important time in the job cycle. It’s where you start building your reputation, your relationships, and your influence. It might seem superficial, but whatever you build up during that first 90 days is going to stick with you for a while. If you’ve done well, you’ll collect enough goodwill from your boss and co-workers to get you through a few rough times. If you’ve started off on the wrong foot, you’ll find yourself having to work twice as hard for twice as long to try to repair the damage that’s been done.

In most jobs, there are two keys to success.

  1. Can you actually do the job?
  2. Can you make your boss happy?

If you didn’t lie on your resume or in your interviews, the presumed answer to the first question is yes. The second one is often the more important, and always the more complex, of the two. So here are a few things that you can do to help ensure your success during that crucial first 90 days.

  • Be nice to EVERYONE. You’re in a new work situation, and you don’t know who’s friends with who, who are the influencers of opinion (especially your boss’ opinion), and who are the ones that you really want on your side. So err on the side of caution and treat everyone with respect. Don’t condescend, don’t belittle. Just be nice. You can never have too many friends. You have all the time in the world to pick sides. For now, pick EVERY side. Your boss will love when people come up and tell him/her how they just met you and they love you. And that love is very good for you.
  • Make the rounds. As you find out the people you’ll be working with on a regular basis, make sure that you take the time and make the effort to introduce yourself. When possible, schedule (or ask your boss to schedule) quick 15-minute meetings or even lunches to actually have a conversation and find out what makes them tick. You’d be amazed how far these initial meetings can go to solidify great working relationships for years to come.
  • Ask questions. During these introduction meetings, and as a general rule, ask lots of questions. Find out what and who makes things happen in your company. Get to know people’s happiness and frustration points. The insight that you gain from the answers will give you the beginnings of a great arsenal of tools for navigating any potentially slippery political or inter-personal situations down the road.
  • Take care of the easy things first. Most of the time, you’re not going to be expected to move heaven and earth in your first 90 days. When you’re given tasks, they’ll often be things that you can execute on quickly. Get them out of the way. Show your boss that you’re reliable and that you only need to be asked once. Stay on top of tasks however works for you – through technology, pen and paper, or your amazing photographic memory that used to impress everyone at parties. However you do it, do it.
  • Put yourself out there. Make sure that, as you’re getting the feel for what’s on your boss’  plate, you make a point to ask if you can help. Sometimes we forget that the boss has responsibilities, deliverables, and stress just like the rest of us. Treat him/her like a human being, and genuinely offer your assistance – even if it’s not something that’s in your job description. Start to solidify your place as the go-to person right off the bat.
  • Don’t over-commit. In the same vain, don’t try to be a superhero. You’re new. You’re learning. If you’re asked to do something, don’t give unrealistic timelines or say that you’ll do something that you’re not really ready for. Better to under-promise and over-deliver than the other way around. Your boss won’t mind that you don’t offer up super-human deadlines. S/he will mind when s/he has to explain to the top brass why a project wasn’t finished when you said it would be.

As Head & Shoulders used to say, “You never get a second chance to make a first impression.” And although I normally wouldn’t recommend that you take advice from a dandruff shampoo, in this case it just makes good sense.

Do you have a question you’d like to see answered on this site? Send an email to HR.Dave1@gmail.com.

Questions or comments about this topic? Please leave them below – it’s a conversation, not a lecture.

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Getting Social – Really Social – in your Job Search

5 Jun


I recently had the honor of speaking on a panel for graduates of Oxford University’s Said School of Business alongside two amazing co-panelists, Lindsey Pollak and James Alexander. The topic was “Social Media in the Job Search.” There was a ton of great conversation and insight, both from the panel and from the audience. One question that sparked a particularly engaging chat was this:

“How does Social Media fit into an overall job search strategy? How do you balance online and offline efforts?”

I love this question, and frankly I think it’s one that not enough people are talking about right now. There’s more information than you can shake a dead goat at about how to use Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, blogging and every other online social tool to help yourself get a great job. But it’s starting to overshadow one basic premise that still holds true. Social Media isn’t going to get you a job. It could potentially help you make a connection that could get you an interview that could lead to a job. But once that connection is made, you’re not using social media anymore. At some point you have to unplug and be, you know, a person.

The fact is that once you land a job, you’re going to have to actually show up, talk to people face-to-face, and generally function in the physical world. The ability to do this, and to do it in a way that gels with your potential employer’s culture, is going to be of paramount importance in the decision of whether or not to hire you. In interviews, how you say things is as important as – and in some cases more important than – what you say. You may be brilliant when locked in a room by yourself, but if you can’t effectively communicate ideas, offer and accept feedback, and generally function in a social environment (as opposed to a “social” one), you’re dead in the water.

So what can you, the social media whiz and guru of all things digital, do to prepare for this cold, real world? The answer is simpler than you might think.

Mix it up a little.

The internet has made it almost ridiculously easy to identify, weigh, and pursue potential job opportunities. You can make your list of dream companies, follow companies, recruiters, and hiring managers on Twitter, LinkedIn and wherever else they’re hanging out, apply online (often directly with your LinkedIn or Facebook profile) and generally manage your search. The fact that it’s so easy has made a lot of people feel like experts, but the ease of online job search has also created a lot of “noise.” Recruiters are inundated with friend requests and messages through a variety of online tools, so no matter your mastery of the medium you’re not standing out from the crowd. If you really want to do something different, go old school. Pick up the phone. Go to an event. Talk to someone in real time.

If just broke out in a cold sweat reading that, don’t worry – you’re not alone. The thought of putting yourself out there in an actual, real-life situation is scarier for most people than the thought of typing your way to a great “personal brand.” But it shouldn’t be. Even though it can take a while to get comfortable just cold-calling a recruiter or introducing yourself at an industry function, let alone giving your “elevator pitch,” you should always remember the upside. Any potential mistakes you make off-line are not searchable. They’ll be just between you and whoever you’re talking to. And there’s something to be said for that. Besides, you probably did better than you think you did. And you definitely made more of an impression than the 10 LinkedIn messages that your competition sent while you were talking.

So don’t abandon all of your social/online strategy – I’m not saying that at all. There’s still a ton of value to be derived there. But take a break now and then and really engage. Call that contact on the phone to ask for an informational interview. Show up at a Meetup or other event taking place in your industry and area. In general, just start talking. Trust me – the more you do it, the easier it will get.

And by the time you find yourself in that interview, when it really matters, you’ll be ready to talk yourself right into that job.

 

Do you have a question you’d like to see answered on this site? Send an email to HR.Dave1@gmail.com.

Questions or comments about this topic? Please leave them below – it’s a conversation, not a lecture.

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